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> Voice-acting Skill
Mamma Peach
Posted: Apr 5 2017, 08:24 AM
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Median - denoting or relating to a value or quantity lying at the midpoint of a frequency distribution of observed values or quantities, such that there is an equal probability of falling above or below it.

I'm imagining (for lack of any real data) two bell curves pretty much the same shape, one denoting large numbers and the other small numbers. That's how I'm seeing it. Total numbers of available VAs in both countries. Yes, there are major differences in how they got there (the same as with actors and musicians). One represents the organized school approach. The other represents the school of hard knocks approach. The organized school approach is easier, but often demotes real creativity. The school of hard knocks is just plain hard, and requires either short cuts (potentially bad for creativity) or determination. People do survive and even thrive in spite of both methods. I've been in the art field and understand the short comings of both. (Also sports like basketball are not in the least similar to the arts.) Frankly I have no real knowledge that would back up any statement about the superior method of training VA's, or realistically what methods actually are used in either country. I'm finding out that there are schools for just about everything here in the US, so I would probably be surprised. So anyway, it's my hypothesis -or rather somewhat un-educated guess- that the median is about equal in quality, but unequal in numbers. And I have no way of proving it either.
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arimareiji
Posted: Apr 5 2017, 12:25 PM
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QUOTE (Mamma Peach @ Apr 5 2017, 07:17 AM)
I'm imagining (for lack of any real data) two bell curves pretty much the same shape, one denoting large numbers and the other small numbers. That's how I'm seeing it. Total numbers of available VAs in both countries. Yes, there are major differences in how they got there (the same as with actors and musicians). One represents the organized school approach. The other represents the school of hard knocks approach. The organized school approach is easier, but often demotes real creativity. The school of hard knocks is just plain hard, and requires either short cuts (potentially bad for creativity) or determination. People do survive and even thrive in spite of both methods. I've been in the art field and understand the short comings of both. (Also sports like basketball are not in the least similar to the arts.) Frankly I have no real knowledge that would back up any statement about the superior method of training VA's, or realistically what methods actually are used in either country. I'm finding out that there are schools for just about everything here in the US, so I would probably be surprised. So anyway, it's my hypothesis -or rather somewhat un-educated guess- that the median is about equal in quality, but unequal in numbers. And I have no way of proving it either.

Bell curves are far from having uniform shapes under different conditions, and are seldom the perfect symmetric shapes we're initially taught about. To get those perfect curves, you typically have to change the spacing between lines on the graph - or as students would know it, grading on a curve. If the whole class does poorly, 40 might become 50 and 60 might become 90 (or vice versa if the whole class does well, though I imagine examples of this are less common).

A curve depicting the energy of each molecule in a glass of water as it's heated or cooled might be a good example*:
user posted image

In the same way, changing conditions that affect the variable you're studying - such as by adding intense competition, high rewards, training and specialization - is going to affect the curve, and I believe in this case will deform it toward higher skill levels.

* - There are probably better, but I was getting sick of all the images derived from the racist treatise The Bell Curve that the search engine turned up. XP
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Mamma Peach
Posted: Apr 6 2017, 07:56 AM
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I can sympathize with that feeling entirely!
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iffy
Posted: Apr 12 2017, 04:12 PM
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We're probably less looking at some dividing line without anyone, between the 50% above and the 50% below, than we are at the 80 in the middle and 10 at each extreme. Ballpark. Depending on the subject. (YMMV)


QUOTE (arimareiji @ Mar 30 2017, 02:28 PM)
I agree with you that that makes a strong circumstantial argument, but I prefer choosing conclusions based on evidence. Not everyone puts the two things in that order.
I prefer solid manners of answering things, when such is available and suitable. When a true cause and effect path can be determined and laid out in a neutral factual way. Ignoring the exceptions that prove the rule, excluding the fringe when it's not significant. However, it's not entirely convincing that there are always such things as evidence-based conclusions, especially for matters of opinion and perception... Although many might disagree with that notion and its determination. Either way, something factual and/or experimentable is not likely ever a value judgment over nuanced and generalized personal preferences. If someone is grading something more non deterministic and fuzzy, there is likely also the question of how entirely fair and unbiased are both the judges and the criteria being used by them. Like where at the end the expected result is known. First we have trial, then you are found guilty.

We will not proclaim which ice cream flavor is the best as some absolute, but we can almost certainly (given the properly collected informative data) determine which is the most sold some place during some period of time. Which of course there are so many factors other than than taste that can impact sales, and even if strawberry (or chocolate or vanilla or orange or peanut) is a perennial favorite overall year to year worldwide, often that means little to the denizens of some given place. (how about cheddar - we don't get much call for it around here)

But like S1arburst I was operating under the impression your question was if it was unreasonable and unfair, bigoted and prejudiced, in negative ways, to think that Japanese VA were in general better at voice-work than American VA were. Thinking it, not establishing its veracity and validity as fact or notion. Given, that is rather simplistic, but even still seems just as difficult to actually answer even after narrowing it down even farther. Personal preferences being what they are.

Either way, thinking something (with or without reason, right or wrong) isn't the same as trying to disprove it. Plenty of people think plenty of things that either are not true, or aren't even in the realm of true and false to begin with. Often without even being aware that their set of facts was merely opinion about unprovable vagueness.


QUOTE (Ningen @ Apr 4 2017, 06:52 PM)
Nonsense.
The average person has 1.99something legs. Most people have 2.
Ah, good point, moving the goalposts a bit a few directions there. Most people are average; whereas the number of legs most people have is 2. (nominally, "people have two legs" or at least they should given the entire bipedal hominid thing) Of course, 'average number of legs' is not the same as 'being average overall' as a unitless sort of undefined quality without qualification or detail. While that average number of legs might be 1.9972381, about no people have other than 0 or 1 or 2 legs. Well, if we don't count partial legs.

As we earlier remarked though, coming up with some ratio of good versus mediocre versus bad in some way doesn't sit there alone, it needs some context. Say, in a country that produces 382 movies a year, having 3 that are five-star isn't impressive, unless perhaps you compare it to a country that produces 182,000 a year and has 1. Certainly less than impressive as compared to a place that produces 74 a year and has 8.
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Mamma Peach
Posted: Apr 13 2017, 08:05 AM
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That last paragraph there was what I was getting at earlier.
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